How to Decide What Size Company You Want to Work At

When you’re looking for a new position, the size of the company you end up working at can significantly impact your job satisfaction. While both big companies and smaller businesses have plenty to offer, they each come with a unique set of benefits and drawbacks. If you don’t factor those into your career decisions, you may find yourself in an environment that doesn’t meet your needs.

Often, the easiest way to decide what size company is right for you is to examine the pros and cons of each arrangement. If you aren’t sure where to begin, here are some insights that can help.

The Pros and Cons of Working for Larger Companies

It’s important to understand that what constitutes a large company may be in the eye of the beholder. For some people, a company with more than 500 employees might feel massive. But it’s crucial to realize that some employers have workforces in the tens of thousands, and some even cross into the millions.

However, many of the larger companies, even if they differ in size, have quite a bit in common. Typically, they follow rigid processes, ensuring continuity across the entire operation. This can be beneficial to anyone appreciating formal procedures, though it may not work well for professionals who enjoy a bit of freedom or autonomy.

As an employee of a large company, you usually get access to subject-matter experts. It isn’t uncommon for job specialization to rise along with the population size so that specific people may tap for different kinds of help. That can be wonderful when you have a complex issue that really requires a depth of know-how you don’t usually find. However, it also means your duties will be more narrow, which some people may not see as ideal.

When it comes to flexibility, you aren’t as likely to find it with a big enterprise. They may have strict policies outlining remote work, promotions, and leave, as well as standardized salary schedules. Often, this helps keep things fair, which can be a boon. But it also means you may not have as much negotiating power, which might be a con.

Finally, advancement may be easier to achieve in a large company. The sheer volume of positions means opportunities may arise regularly. Additionally, they might be clear paths for moving up, taking the mystery out of promotions. However, competition could be fiercer, which is a potential drawback.

The Pros and Cons of Working for Smaller Businesses

With a smaller business, you usually get more flexibility. The management layers aren’t as deep, so they may not oversee every decision or choice. This can give you more autonomy, but it also might lead to less support or guidance.

Plus, you won’t usually find rigid policies about salaries, leave, or other benefits. You may have an easier time negotiating or may have quicker access to telecommuting or other work-life balance options. However, it does mean losing some of the protection standardization can provide since, if you’re not a strong negotiator, you may not come out as well.

There’s also a good chance that your responsibilities will be broader. With fewer team members, employees usually have to wear at least a couple of hats. Your days will have more variety, but you may have to take on duties that aren’t in your wheelhouse or don’t keep you engaged, which is important to consider.

Finally, promotional opportunities may be less available. There aren’t as many positions, reducing the number of chances to move up. However, when they do come along, you won’t face the same amount of competition, which may work in your favor.

Ultimately, it would help if you considered which option may work best for you. Consider your needs and preferences, then target companies that bring what you want to the table.

If you’d like to learn more, the team at The Advance Group wants to hear from you. Contact us today.

 

 

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